Critical Social Justice Keynote: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (10/25)

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My Story, My Voice: A Video Premiere (10/24)

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Art of Transformation: Arts and the New Economy (7/28)

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Baltimoreans of the Sandtown/Winchester neighborhood and surrounding areas are telling their own stories on the intricate and powerful relationship between local economy, the arts, and the soul of a community. These stories are being shared in cultural listening sessions to counteract misleading narratives about life in West Baltimore. Citizen Artist Baltimore is presenting feedback on the cultural listening sessions. Still, questions remain about the potential of the arts and media to better understand the practice of culture which can impact policy.


Join us for short movies on the Sandtown/Winchester neighborhood, and a glimpse of a new public media project to address these questions. Cultural Agent at U.S. Department of Arts and Culture, Denise Johnson; and UMBC media artist and researcher, Lee Boot will host an interactive media screening and discussion.

This project is being developed by the Imaging Research Center at UMBC in collaboration with Baltimore Imagining Group (big) a coalition of individuals from Baltimore arts, community, and social justice organizations. Collaborators include Culture Works, The US Department of Arts and Culture, Equity Matters, New Lens, and Wombwork Productions. Baltimore Stories, a series of humanities events, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is a collaboration between the University of Maryland, Maryland Humanities Council, the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Register

 

Art of Transformation: Reworking Baltimore’s Stories (6/23)

Art of Transformation

Baltimoreans are telling their own stories to counteract misleading narratives about life in our city. Scholars are working to set the record straight on history and policy. Activists are organizing. Artists are engaging like never before. Still, questions remain about inclusiveness, public space and public media for deliberating and consensus building, and the potential of the arts and media to transform culture and impact policy.

Join us for dinner, short movies, and a glimpse of a new public media project to address these questions. WombWork Productions founders and co-directors, Kay Lawal-Muhammad and Mama Rashida Forman-Bey; writer/director and UMBC Professor, Alan Kreizenbeck; and UMBC media artist and researcher, Lee Boot will host an interactive media screening and discussion while you eat a yummy meal.

This project is being developed by the Imaging Research Center at UMBC in collaboration with Baltimore Imagining Group (big) a coalition of individuals from Baltimore arts, community, and social justice organizations. Collaborators include Culture Works, The US Department of Arts and Culture, Equity Matters, New Lens, and Wombwork ProductionsBaltimore Stories, a series of humanities events, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is a collaboration between the University of Maryland, Maryland Humanities Council, the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance

Multiple Communities, Multiple Stories (4/23)

Multiple Communities, Multiple Stories

Mapping Dialogues (4/5)

Mapping Dialogues

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The Long Shadow: Poverty, Privilege & Education in Baltimore (3/23)

The Long Shadow

Poverty, Privilege & Education in Baltimore

Wednesday, March 23, 2016
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Library and Gallery, Albin O. Kuhn

Karl Alexander

Dr. Karl Alexander, Research Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University

The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth and the Transition to Adulthood tells the story of the Baltimore-based Beginning School Study Youth Panel (BSSYP), a probability sample of typical urban children who came of age over the last decades of the 20th Century and into the first decade of the 21st.  It is an account of their social mobility from origins to destinations, framed in life-course perspective. Two characteristic mobility paths are documented, both grounded in family resources: 1) status attainment through school serves mainly to preserve middle class privilege across generations; 2) status attainment in the non-college workforce privileges lower SES whites over African Americans of like background, white men most immediately through access to high wage employment in the remnants of Baltimore’s old industrial economy and then, derivatively, to the lower SES white women who marry and partner with them.

Co-Sponsored by: Honors College and Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars Program

Speak Your Truth: UMBC Edition (2/17)

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Black Lives Matter: More than a Hashtag! It’s a Movement! (2/1)

Black Lives Matter

Be a Voice, Not an Echo (1/30)

Be a Voice, Not an Echo